Our selection of case studies showcase a cross section of recent QODA projects.

We are an energetic and enthusiastic Design Engineering Consultancy led by highly experienced and talented engineers, working across mechanical, electrical and sustainable areas of building design. To find out more about what we do, check out our case studies below.

The See Houses

QODA was appointed by the Church of England to set out a roadmap to achieving net zero carbon emissions in operation by 2030 across its buildings. A portfolio of thirty-nine cathedrals and thirty See houses were analysed as part of this project. To evaluate what the transformation to net zero carbon would mean at each site, surveys were conducted to document the existing building fabric and services, and energy consumption data was used to evaluate the current operational carbon footprint.

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Cambridge Investment Partnership – Aylesborough Close

QODA are acting as MEP and Passivhaus Consultants for the Aylesborough Close development with Cambridge Investment Partnerships and BPTW. The development will provide 70 affordable homes across three sites and a community garden with play equipment and seating for residents to enjoy. The objectives of the project are to create low-carbon, environmentally, and socially sustainable new places to live in Cambridge.

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Case Study

Cambridge Investment Partnership

QODA were appointed as MEP and Passivhaus Consultants working alongside Cambridge Investment Partnership and professional team across nine sites in Cambridgeshire, totalling over 775 new dwellings. Achieving Passivhaus accreditation for all the dwellings is a key objective. QODA’s Passivhaus designers led the conceptual design, fully committed to a fabric first approach to energy efficiency and low carbon approaches to architectural, structural, and building services design strategies. QODA’s in-house expertise and close coordination with MEP engineering strategies provide sustainable design solutions enhancing the Passivhaus design. The Passivhaus Planning Package (PHPP) modelling is key in monitoring the design development and sustainability, including Photovoltaic panels generating solar power for hot water and heating with feed-in tariffs back to the National Grid. QODA continues to advise on local and global pollution issues, health and wellbeing, human-centric design, and creating social value in the community.

Case Study

Agar Grove

QODA have been commissioned by Hill Construction to collect construction evidence for Passivhaus certification for the Agar Grove Estate redevelopment Phase 1C. Originally built in the 1960’s, Agar Grove forms part of Camden Council’s Community Investment Programme and aims to promote a ‘fabric-first’ approach to improve energy performance. The new homes will be built to achieve Passivhaus certification, and the scheme is set to become the UK’s largest residential Passivhaus development when all works are complete. The development will replace low rise social housing blocks clustered around an eighteen-storey tower served by its own shop and café, with a range of house types including maisonettes and tower block flats. Emphasis has been placed upon creating liveable spaces between homes and improved pedestrian, cycle, and vehicle connectivity across the site. Once all phases of the regeneration are complete the housing capacity will almost double.

Case Study

University of the West of England (UWE) SAP3

QODA have been appointed as part of the design team lead by architects Stride Treglown, for the UWE SAP3 project which consists of the development of a new 2000 bedroom student accommodation scheme. We have been appointed primarily as the Passivhaus and sustainability consultants on the project, having previously worked with the university to produce a sustainability design guide helping to address their 2030 zero carbon targets. QODA are also appointed for MEP duties which are being carried out as part of a joint venture between ourselves and another consultant.

One of the key drivers we are working on is the requirement for the project to meet Passivhaus standards, as well as looking forward to how the project can help facilitate the ability for the university to achieve its end goal of being zero carbon by 2030. The project is also being carried out to full BIM level 2 requirements.

Case Study

Residential Development, London Borough of Ealing

The London Borough of Ealing have commenced an extensive programme of residential development across the borough. This exciting masterplan includes a number of sites (currently 10) which have been divided into 3 packages for design and construction purposes. QODA have been appointed as MEP designers for Package 3 and have also secured a role across all 3 packages as Net Zero Carbon Champions. We will be employing Passivhaus modelling and assessment to inform the design and deliver Ealing’s commitment to carbon reduction. Ealing are developing their net zero carbon design guide and have identified Certified Passivhaus building as a key part of its strategy.

Case Study

Learning Centre – Kew Gardens

QODA are providing Passivhaus consultancy and MEP design for the new Learning Centre at the Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew. The project is set to be pioneering and plant-based as well as achieving Passivhaus Premium standard. The project comprises of a range of classrooms, labs, offices, and a seminar space to provide an inspiring learning experience to visitors. QODA are currently developing the design to take full advantage of the low energy aspirations of the project, including demand-based mixed mode ventilation and natural cooling, reversible heat pumps within the main air handling system, rainwater harvesting and PV. QODA are working closely with the Architect, Hazle McCormack Young (HMY), to guide the built form by developing a range of dynamic models in order to achieve BREEAM exemplary daylighting in tandem with exceptional energy and overheating performance.

Case Study

Convent Way

QODA have been appointed as MEP and Sustainable Engineers for the 1000 dwellings masterplan at Convent Way, which spans across 5 phases. The project is trying to set a new urban dwelling standard for the London Borough of Hillingdon in terms of integrating Passivhaus design, landscaping, sustainable transport, and building quality. Car parking will be covered with podiums to create a healthy and vibrant community. QODA are designing a communal ambient heat network to provide maximum benefit to the client with respect to plant capital expenditure and space consumption, while trying to minimise tenant bills. The 2 stage reversible heat pump and passive design features will maximise thermal comfort now, while also meeting the climate challenges of 2050 and 2080 with minimal refurbishment.

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IDRM, University of Oxford

QODA have been appointed as Passivhaus Consultants for the Institute of Developmental and Regenerative Medicine (IDRM) at the University of Oxford. This is a cutting edge research facility, aiming to promote multidisciplinary working and collaboration across three key areas; cardiology, neurology and immunology.  Working with McLaughlin and Harvey and SRA Architects, QODA are responsible for design and site duties for all aspects of Passivhaus design, including a particular focus on delivering class-leading airtightness. Project value: £23.5m.

Case Study

St Peter’s College, University of Oxford

Under QODA’s leadership, St Peter’s College committed to the Passivhaus Low Energy Building standard as a key approach to delivering their sustainable building aspirations. QODA were appointed as Passivhaus Consultants for the project, guiding the design team to develop a compliant scheme. This has involved influencing the construction system, the façade design, as well as dealing with complexities including the proximity of historic structures, façade noise issues, and stringent planning targets, which were comfortably met by the Passivhaus approach. The approach has also led to the simplification of the M&E design, in particular, the proposed use of electric heating, which eliminates the need for wet heating pipework and boilers. The overheating risk has been carefully considered for the project, leading to a thermal strategy consisting of secure ventilation through screened openings, thermal mass, optimised glazing design (including deep reveals for shading), and the option for future cooling to be added through the air system allowing resilience to climate change.